Ecological Challenges

Ecological Challenges

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports recent national surveys concluded U.S. waters are stressed by nutrient pollution, excess sedimentation, and degradation of shoreline vegetation, affecting almost 50% of our lakes, rivers and streams. The rate which new waters are listed for water quality impairments exceeds the pace restored waters are removed from the list. 

The EPA, other Federal, state and non-government agencies strive to protect and restore our waters so our drinking water is safe; sustains aquatic ecosystems for fish, plants, wildlife, and economic and recreational activities; and protects rare, threatened and endangered species.

At the same time, our population is growing and increasing economic development activities that impact our natural environment. The ecologist studies, alleviates, and mitigates the impacts of development. They do this through Environmental Impact Studies and Assessments, habitat improvement projects, water quality studies, aquatic and terrestrial inventory studies, evaluation of impacts to aquatic and terrestrial resources, and development of traditional and adaptive management plans for natural resources.